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May
5
Thu
2022
13 Husbands’ health education on decision of delivery place in Kaduna, Nigeria
May 5 @ 10:00 – 10:50
13 Husbands’ health education on decision of delivery place in Kaduna, Nigeria @ Room C - BBB

Speaker: Hadiza Mohammed Sani

Facilitator: Fridah Ndinga

The study was carried out to determine the opinions of couples on who decides the place of baby’s birth and also their preferred place for delivery. Quasi-experimental research design was used for the study where non- randomized control group design was used, with a control and study group. Ethical clearance was given by Kaduna Ministry of Health. The result of the study showed that decision on place of birth for the baby is mostly done by both husband and wife in the two groups (13.2% for the control and 16.9% for the study group). The results also showed that 30.1% and 34.6% of mothers in the control and study group would prefer to have their babies delivered in clinics or hospitals. Among the husbands, 30.1 and 36.0% would prefer to have such babies delivered in clinics or hospitals. 

Recording: https://youtu.be/SjLEKk9_nD8

14 A systematic review of cervical cancer screening practices among female health workers in Nigeria
May 5 @ 11:00 – 11:50
14 A systematic review of cervical cancer screening practices among female health workers in Nigeria @ Room A - BBB

Speaker: Elvis Anyaechiechukwu Okolie

Facilitator: Caroline Maringa

Cervical cancer is a disease of inequality and the commonest gynaecological cancer affecting women in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) including Nigeria. While vaccination and screening have been shown to prevent cervical cancer, LMICs still account for more than 85% of the disease burden. Female health workers (FHWs) are expected to play a significant role in driving screening efforts. This study systematically investigated factors influencing cervical cancer screening among Nigerian FHWs. Upon completion of a systematic literature search involving six databases, 15 primary studies involving 3392 FHWs in Nigeria were included in this study. While FHWs had good knowledge and positive attitude towards cervical cancer screening, screening uptake was poor. Prevalent barriers included fear of positive results, cost, low-risk perception, and lack of time. Therefore, it becomes critical to implement interventions that translate FHWs cervical cancer knowledge and attitudes into screening uptake and recommendation for other women.

For additional information see: Research paper: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/cnr2.1514

Recording: https://youtu.be/y9ZnL0D_mSY

19 Men’s experiences of attending a traumatic birth, in Nigeria
May 5 @ 16:00 – 16:50
19 Men's experiences of attending a traumatic birth, in Nigeria @ Room C - BBB

Speakers: Halima Musa Abdul, 

Facilitator: Cynthia Pitter

Growing recognition of the impact of pregnancy loss and neonatal death has led to research focusing on the emotional burden on bereaved families. Women’s traumatic birth experiences have received a lot of attention; however, nothing is known about men’s experiences of attending a traumatic birth in Nigeria. This paper explores men’s experiences of childbirth that were traumatic for them. The study used a phenomenological approach. Respondents were recruited via social media platforms. Interviews were conducted among seven participants through Skype and face to face. Thematic analysis was used for data analysis supported by NVivo 12. Themes generated include experiences of the trauma, impact on fathers’ well-being and surviving the trauma. Men may experience severe psychological distress during and after childbirth. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the midwifery team to understand the impact of men’s attendance during traumatic childbirth in order to improve their well-being and their family.

Co-authors Balarabe Fatima, Abubakar Isa, Rufai Ahmad

Recording: https://youtu.be/xDElXaDuapQ