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May
5
Thu
2022
03 Invited Speakers :: Taumanova Alvarez Acosta and Sonia Cavia (Spanish)
May 5 @ 00:00 – 00:50
03 Invited Speakers :: Taumanova Alvarez Acosta and Sonia Cavia (Spanish) @ Room C - BBB

Title: Mujeres y parteras: Fortalecimiento en red  / Women and midwives: Strengthening Through Network 

Invited Speakers: Taumanova Alvarez Acosta and Sonia Cavia

Facilitator: Paola Wilkin

RELACAHUPAN (Red latinoamericana y del Caribe  por la humanización del parto y nacimiento )

El objetivo de la red está centrado en apoyar y promover la consolidación de modelos respetuosos de atención a las mujeres y familias durante sus procesos de gestar, parir, nacer. 

Siendo múltiples los contextos  y realidades en Latinoamérica y el Caribe, las parteras siguen siendo  personas claves en el cuidado de la vida, no solo por su pertinencia social , si no por su valiosísimo conocimiento y auténtica empatía.

Queremos compartir en este espacio, lo que es la RELACAHUPAN, algunas iniciativas que suman al reconocimiento de las parteras y dignificar su práctica en los distintos contextos , así como promover las alianzas en red como estrategia para seguir concretando en el cotidiano los derechos de las mujeres y de las mujeres parteras.

RELACAHUPAN (Latin American and Caribbean Network for the Humanization of Childbirth)

The objective of the network is focused on supporting and promoting the consolidation of respectful models of care for women and families during their pregnancy and childbirth  processes.

In the face of multiple contexts and realities in Latin America and the Caribbean, midwives continue to be key in the care for life, not only because of their social relevance, but also because of their invaluable knowledge and authentic empathy.

We want to share in this space, what RELACAHUPAN is, some initiatives that add to the recognition of midwives and to dignify their practice in different contexts, as well as to promote network alliances as a strategy to continue concretizing the rights of women and women midwives in daily life.

Recording: https://youtu.be/CLkO8ydoN5k

CANCELLED :: 04 Women’s traditional birth attendant utilization at birth and associated factors in Angolella, Ethiopia
May 5 @ 01:00 – 01:50
CANCELLED :: 04 Women’s traditional birth attendant utilization at birth and associated factors in Angolella, Ethiopia @ Room C - BBB

Speaker: Birhan Tsegaw Taye

Facilitator: Catherine Salam

Background: In low and middle-income countries, many childbirths still occur at home unskilled attendants. This study assessed reasons for traditional birth attendants’ preference, utilization, and associated factors.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was employed among 416 women. Study participants were recruited by a simple random sampling technique. Data were collected using a pretested and interviewer-administered questionnaire. A multivariable logistic regression model was fitted and the level of significance was determined at a p-value of 0.05.

Result: About 31.5% of the participants were used traditional birth attendants (TBAs) in their recent birth. Marital status, age marriage, time to reach a health facility, know danger signs, attitude towards TBAs, antenatal care follow-up, and listening radio were predictors of TBA utilization at birth. 

Conclusion: Still TBAs are women’s first choice of birth attendants. Antenatal care and health education programs might enhance skilled delivery utilization and strategies targeted on reasons for TBAs preference over skilled attendants.

Please be sure to check the poster Birhan Tsegaw Taye prepared on this topic.  https://vidm.org/vidm-2022-research-posters/

06 Obesity-related risk in pregnancy: Those most affected and reducing that risk
May 5 @ 03:00 – 03:50
CANCELLED :: 06 Discontinuation of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods and associated factors among women in health facilities of Bahir Dar City, North West Ethiopia, 2021
May 5 @ 03:00 – 03:50
CANCELLED :: 06 Discontinuation of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods and associated factors among women in health facilities of Bahir Dar City, North West Ethiopia, 2021 @ Room C - BBB

Speakers: Yilkal Dagnaw Melesse and Ambaye Minayehu Zegeye

Facilitator: Paola Wilkin

Introduction: Discontinuation of these methods exposes a woman to unwanted pregnancy, unsafe abortions, and unplanned births. Despite the improvement in the availability and utilization of these methods, discontinuation is becoming high. Methods: health facility-based cross-sectional study was conducted on 415 participants and data entry and analysis were done. A P-value of less than 0.05 was considered a statistically significant factor for discontinuation.

Results: The overall proportion of discontinuation of long-acting reversible contraceptives was 66.3% (95% CI:61.42-69.13).No formal education (AOR=.49; 95% CI:0.30-0.82), primary school education (AOR=.39; 95% CI:0.18-0.81), desire for pregnancy(AOR=2.57; 95% CI:1.64-4.02), past history of modern contraceptive utilization (AOR=2.01; 95% CI:1.19-3.38), lack of counseling about benefits (AOR=1.68; 95% CI:1.08-2.62) and side effects (AOR=1.95; 95 CI:1.21-3.16) were the associated factors for discontinuation.

Conclusion: The overall discontinuation of long-acting reversible contraceptives was high. Education, the desire for pregnancy, past history of utilization, lack of counselling, and side effects were factors for discontinuation.

 

 

07 Initiation of Sekolah Komplementer Cinta Ibu (SEKOCI) program in realizing safe motherhood-based antenatal care in Indonesia
May 5 @ 04:00 – 04:50
07 Initiation of Sekolah Komplementer Cinta Ibu (SEKOCI) program in realizing safe motherhood-based antenatal care in Indonesia @ Room C - BBB

Speaker: Rizka Ayu Setyani

Facilitator: Gita Nirmala Sari

Safe motherhood in midwifery care entails providing all women with the knowledge and resources necessary to navigate pregnancy and delivery safely. However, the increase in maternal and infant mortality is still a global problem, especially in Indonesia.  We initiated the Sekolah Komplementer Cinta Ibu (SEKOCI) program in Indonesia from 2020 until now. The aim was to realize safe motherhood-based antenatal care services with a holistic complementary midwifery care approach. The SEKOCI approach method is hybrid, combining an offline class system by volunteer midwives and online telehealth. The focus of our activities is to share relaxation techniques through massage, yoga, and self-healing. We also empower pregnant women and families to monitor and care for pregnancies independently during the COVID-19 pandemic. As a result, there is a decrease in complications from pregnancy to delivery and postnatal. We recommend the government scale up the SEKOCI program so that it has a broad impact.

Recording: https://youtu.be/gX_FxUJCf0g

10 Depression, anxiety, and stress during COVID-19 pandemic among midwives in Ethiopia: A nationwide cross-sectional survey
May 5 @ 07:00 – 07:50
10 Depression, anxiety, and stress during COVID-19 pandemic among midwives in Ethiopia: A nationwide cross-sectional survey @ Room C - BBB

Speakers: Belayneh Ayanaw Kassie

Facilitator: Ally Anderson

Cross-sectional study was conducted from June to August 2020 among 1,691 Midwives in Ethiopia. Simple random sampling technique was used to select study participants and data collected using telephone interviews. Data entered using the Google forms and analyzed with SPSS. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses employed. 

 The overall prevalence of depression 41.1% [95% CI: 38.6, 43.7], anxiety 29.6% [95%CI: 27.3, 31.8] and stress 19.0% [95% CI: 17.0, 20.8]. The sex of midwives (AOR=1.35), working in rural area (AOR=1.39), poor knowledge towards COVID-19 (AOR=1.40), poor preventive practice (AOR=1.83) and substance use (AOR=0.31) were significantly associated with depression. Moreover, working in public health facilities (AOR=2.44), poor preventive practice (AOR=1,47) and poor attitude (AOR=2.22) were significantly associated with anxiety. Stress were affected by working in rural areas (AOR=0.57), substance use (AOR=2.06), poor knowledge (AOR=1.44) and poor practice (AOR=1.60). 

Study findings show high rates of Depression, Anxiety and Stress among midwives in Ethiopia.

Recording: https://youtu.be/-Upa-XCID4U

CANCELLED :: 11 Reproductive health services utilization and associated factors among youth in North Shoa zone town administrations, Amhara region, Ethiopia
May 5 @ 08:00 – 08:50
CANCELLED :: 11  Reproductive health services utilization and associated factors among youth in North Shoa zone town administrations, Amhara region, Ethiopia @ Room 3 - BBB

Speaker: Yeshinat Lakew Ambaw

Facilitator: Caroline Maringa

Background: One third world population is adolescents. Promoting healthy practices during youth, and taking steps to better protect young people from health risks and prevent them from health problems in future adulthood. Objective: To assess reproductive health services utilization and associated factors among youth in North Shoa zone town administrations, Amhara region, Ethiopia 2021 Methods: A community-based cross-sectional study design was conducted from November 01/2020 to January 01/2021. A multi-stage sampling technique was used. Result: The prevalence of reproductive health services utilization was found to be 34.8% with (95% CI:30.9,38.5). Sex, occupational status, living arrangement, discussed RH issues, heard about youth-friendly reproductive service, the existence of youth-friendly reproductive health service facility around their living area, convenient working hours, person preference was found to be significantly associated with reproductive service utilization. Conclusion: Reproductive health service utilization among youth was found to be lower. Therefore, need health promotion and education regarding RHS.

13 Husbands’ health education on decision of delivery place in Kaduna, Nigeria
May 5 @ 10:00 – 10:50
13 Husbands’ health education on decision of delivery place in Kaduna, Nigeria @ Room C - BBB

Speaker: Hadiza Mohammed Sani

Facilitator: Fridah Ndinga

The study was carried out to determine the opinions of couples on who decides the place of baby’s birth and also their preferred place for delivery. Quasi-experimental research design was used for the study where non- randomized control group design was used, with a control and study group. Ethical clearance was given by Kaduna Ministry of Health. The result of the study showed that decision on place of birth for the baby is mostly done by both husband and wife in the two groups (13.2% for the control and 16.9% for the study group). The results also showed that 30.1% and 34.6% of mothers in the control and study group would prefer to have their babies delivered in clinics or hospitals. Among the husbands, 30.1 and 36.0% would prefer to have such babies delivered in clinics or hospitals. 

Recording: https://youtu.be/SjLEKk9_nD8

15 Effect of nursing educational program on exclusive breastfeeding of adolescent mothers attending ANC at Primary Health Centers in Zaria Metropolis
May 5 @ 12:00 – 12:50
15 Effect of nursing educational program on exclusive breastfeeding of adolescent mothers attending ANC at Primary Health Centers in Zaria Metropolis @ Room C - BBB

Speakers: Amina Abdulraheem

Facilitator: Halima Musa Abdul

Adolescent mothers are at increased risk of having preterm birth, low-birth-weight babies and low knowledge of exclusive breastfeeding. The study aimed to evaluate the effect of nursing educational program on exclusive breastfeeding of adolescent mothers attending Antenatal clinic in Zaria Metropolis. A quasi experimental design using a multistage sampling technique to obtain data from 302 adolescent mothers. Data were collected using structured and validated interviewer-administered questionnaire and observation checklist before and after the intervention. Descriptive statistics, unpaired-sample t-test and segmented Poisson regression were used to evaluate the effect. At post-tests, the mean knowledge and practice scores of mothers in the intervention group improved significantly (P value 0.05) at first week, 6th week, 10th week, 14th week and 6th month postpartum. Mothers in the intervention group were more satisfied with their role of exclusive breastfeeding than those in the control group (p-value 0.0000). There is a need for midwives to continue health educating adolescent mothers on exclusive breastfeeding…

Co-authors: Hayat Gommaa and Ayishetu U Musa-Maliki

Recording: https://youtu.be/f7QFHHol_f4

 

17 Obesity matters: Raising and maintaining dialogue with women
May 5 @ 14:00 – 14:50
17 Obesity matters: Raising and maintaining dialogue with women @ Room C - BBB

Speaker: Yvonne Greig

Facilitator: Eunice Atsali

Obese pregnant women (BMI & 30kg) are at increased risk of developing complications during pregnancy, labour and birth. Furthermore, their offspring are at risk of short- and long-term health complications. Midwives are ideally situated to inform women about risks and to support them in optimising their health. How midwives raise and maintain dialogue with women about this health issue is not well understood. A qualitative research study was conducted drawing on the principles of social constructionism to explore how midwives practiced and maintained dialogue with women about the risks of living with obesity. Data were analysed thematically, three themes emerged: “situational context of practice”, constructing partnerships with women, midwife as a public health agent. Midwives appeared to have learnt their communication skills informally, and utilised institutional questionnaires as a mechanism for opening “sensitive” conversations. This approach appeared to guide appointment dialogue but risked the woman-centred philosophy of midwifery care. Providing educational opportunities for midwives with respect to consultation education in midwifery curricula may strengthen midwifery practice with respect to discussing sensitive topics.

Recording: https://youtu.be/TWSqIlpBDWA

18 Midwives in focus: Exploring professional identity, strong midwifery leadership and representations of midwifery around the world
May 5 @ 15:00 – 15:50
18 Midwives in focus: Exploring professional identity, strong midwifery leadership and representations of midwifery around the world @ Room C - BBB

Speaker: Sally Pezaro and Pandora Hardtman

Facilitator: Susan Kiamba

Scaling up quality midwifery and strong midwifery leadership has been identified as a “global priority”, as evidence demonstrates that the provision of high-quality care by midwives can avert the majority of maternal and neonatal deaths worldwide. Yet the latest “State of the World’s Midwifery” report outlines how midwifery work remains undervalued. This may be in part due to the integration of midwifery and nursing along with a lack of representation and guidance for strong leadership for the midwifery profession.

Therefore aim of this project was to:

  1.  Measure and compare the professional identity of both midwives and nurse-midwives
  2.  Collect examples of strong midwifery leadership and explore how such leadership may be upscaled and sustained.
  3.  Invite midwives/nurse-midwives to consider how they might instantiate or ‘represent’ the midwifery profession to the world.

This presentation will share ‘Midwives In Focus’, our early analyses and results including international representations of midwifery.

Recording: https://youtu.be/-epm6VStcX8

 

19 Men’s experiences of attending a traumatic birth, in Nigeria
May 5 @ 16:00 – 16:50
19 Men's experiences of attending a traumatic birth, in Nigeria @ Room C - BBB

Speakers: Halima Musa Abdul, 

Facilitator: Cynthia Pitter

Growing recognition of the impact of pregnancy loss and neonatal death has led to research focusing on the emotional burden on bereaved families. Women’s traumatic birth experiences have received a lot of attention; however, nothing is known about men’s experiences of attending a traumatic birth in Nigeria. This paper explores men’s experiences of childbirth that were traumatic for them. The study used a phenomenological approach. Respondents were recruited via social media platforms. Interviews were conducted among seven participants through Skype and face to face. Thematic analysis was used for data analysis supported by NVivo 12. Themes generated include experiences of the trauma, impact on fathers’ well-being and surviving the trauma. Men may experience severe psychological distress during and after childbirth. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the midwifery team to understand the impact of men’s attendance during traumatic childbirth in order to improve their well-being and their family.

Co-authors Balarabe Fatima, Abubakar Isa, Rufai Ahmad

Recording: https://youtu.be/xDElXaDuapQ

20 Tranexamic acid for postpartum hemorrhage: Here, there, and everywhere
May 5 @ 17:00 – 17:50
20 Tranexamic acid for postpartum hemorrhage: Here, there, and everywhere @ Room C - BBB

Speakers: Ruth Mielke and Angela Sojobi

Facilitator: Jackson Ngaruiya Muchiri

In the United States, tranexamic acid (TXA) is an approved antifibrinolytic agent for women experiencing heavy menstrual bleeding. Large, multi-site studies have also demonstrated TXA effectiveness in reducing death from blood loss following trauma and major surgery and most recently, obstetric hemorrhage. As a result, WHO recommends the use of TXA in obstetrics – specifically for primary management of the most common type of obstetric hemorrhage, postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). In the U.S., professional organizations recommend TXA as an adjunctive therapy for PPH. The use of TXA to prevent PPH in vaginal and cesarean delivery is also being studied from population and risk-based perspectives. This presentation will present the a) use of TXA in the context of the physiologic changes of pregnancy b) use of TXA in the treatment of PPH in the United States, c) state of the science globally with respect to prophylactic use TXA use to prevent PPH.

Recording: https://youtu.be/mWAYQFxzLtc

22 Enhancing uptake of antenatal care in a socio-economically deprived and ethnically dense locality
May 5 @ 19:00 – 19:50
22 Enhancing uptake of antenatal care in a socio-economically deprived and ethnically dense locality @ Room C - BBB

Speaker: Esther Sharma and Shuby Puthussery

Facilitator: Jane Houston

Background: The aims of this research project are to explore improving timely uptake of antenatal care in the UK.

Data analysis was undertaken, looking at hospital data in an area with high levels of socio-economic deprivation and ethnic diversity. A systematic literature review examined the evidence surrounding ethnic minority women’s experiences of accessing antenatal care in high income European countries. A co-produced intervention was developed, aiming to increase uptake of antenatal care.

Discussion: Of all ethnic groups, Black African and Black Caribbean women had the highest proportion of women booking late. Structural factors impact access to antenatal care for ethnic minority women in high-income European countries. Multiple methods of co-production enabled a diversity of service users to develop a community-level intervention to increase uptake of antenatal care.

Conclusions: There is a need to develop interventions to increase timely initiation of antenatal care.

Recording: https://youtu.be/BydTVIdT_EA

23 Connection in midwifery: A student midwife perspective
May 5 @ 20:00 – 20:50
23 Connection in midwifery: A student midwife perspective @ Room C - BBB

Speaker: Marie Buckleygray

Facilitator: Stella Katuku

This presentation will describe the importance and value of human connection in Midwifery from the perspective of a student midwife. It will briefly cover the relevant theory and then apply it to examples. The examples will give different perspectives drawing from anonymised practice and continuity of carer caseloads within the new Midwifery course. The presentation will also draw from examples of building student body community during times of potential disconnection in the epidemic lockdowns and moving forward. This presentation will discuss the changes experienced by midwifery students and how these changes could potentially impact our profession and maternity services in the long term.

Recording: https://youtu.be/7Y4A8IVeGEI