All sessions of the VIDM 2021 Conference are held using BigBlueButton. All times are in UTC. A link to the time in your location can be found with each session. NOTE: The same link is used to access the VIDM Conference Rooms. See the instructions “How to Access the Conference”.  Headsets are strongly recommended for best audio.

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May
4
Tue
2021
02. Supporting the Family Ecology: The critical implications of first time fathers massaging their infants after birth @ Room 4, BBB
May 4 @ 23:00 – 23:50
02. Supporting the Family Ecology: The critical implications of first time fathers massaging their infants after birth @ Room 4, BBB

Speaker: Mary Kay Keller

Facilitator: Leila Kent

New fathers step into the role of fathering with little support from family systems (McBride, 1989; McBride & Lutz, 2004), and transitioning into this role is often stressful (Sanders, Dittman, Keown, Farrauggia & Rose, 2010; Willinger, Diendorfer-Radner, Willnauer, Jorgl, & Hager, 2005). Furthermore, the marital relationship is negatively impacted as parents adjust to their new roles (Johns & Belsky, 2008), and this change may also impact attachment to their infant (Green, Furrer & McAllister, 2007). Infant massage training provides the opportunity, skills, and the feeling of parental competence in interacting with their infants. Cheng, Volk, and Marini (2011) found that fathers greatly benefited from infant massage group classes with other fathers. Infant massage taught either in group or in-home could greatly benefit the family relationships. These outcomes have implications for fathers, professionals, and research. How can professionals be inclusive of fathers?

Time: http://bit.ly/VIDoM21-session-02

Recording: TBA

May
5
Wed
2021
04. Brave Actions & Strange Alliances – Addressing maternity health inequity in South Auckland, Aotearoa @ Room 4, BBB
May 5 @ 01:00 – 01:50
04. Brave Actions & Strange Alliances - Addressing maternity health inequity in South Auckland, Aotearoa @ Room 4, BBB

Speaker: Isabella Smart

Facilitator: Paula Pelletier-Butler

The image of clean, green, Covid-free New Zealand is admired throughout the world. But behind the bungee jumps and spectacular scenery is one of the highest rates of domestic violence in the southern hemisphere. Counties Manukau District Health Board (CMDHB) community midwives service South Auckland and offer care to around 2000 women a year. CMDHB has the highest level of urban poverty and social disadvantage in Aotearoa, with high rates of homelessness, poor housing, food insecurity, transport and absolute poverty, alcohol/drug use and child protection interventions. Our population baseline health profile is poor. Most women under our care experience significant non-maternity factors which affect their engagement in care and their pregnancy outcomes. The presentation outlines how innovative midwifery service delivery has evolved in response to a deficit environment with the aim of tackling health and social inequity and challenging the impact of colonisation and racism on Maaori and Pasifika whaanau.

Time: bit.ly/VIDoM21-session-04

Recording: TBA

06. The birth equity in the midwifery services of pregnant women living with HIV/AIDS in Indonesia, has been realized? @ Room 4, BBB
May 5 @ 03:00 – 03:50
06. The birth equity in the midwifery services of pregnant women living with HIV/AIDS in Indonesia, has been realized? @ Room 4, BBB

Speaker: Rizka Ayu Setyani

Facilitator: Herliana Riska and Istri Bartini

Prevention Mother to Child Transmission (PMTCT) is an effort to prevent HIV/AIDS from pregnancy, childbirth, until breastfeeding. However, stigma and discrimination are still the biggest obstacles. This study aimed to find out the stigmatization of midwives in pregnant women living with HIV/AIDS in Indonesia. This qualitative research used a case study approach. Data collection was done by focus group discussion technique in midwives group in hospitals, Public Health Centers, and private practice then analyzed with content analysis. This study showed that the most stigmatization of pregnant women living with HIV/AIDS was found in midwives’ private practice. They considered pregnant women living with HIV/AIDS as someone who had deviant behavior, and assuming HIV/AIDS was a dangerous virus. In conclusion, birth equity had not realized in the midwifery services of pregnant women living with HIV/AIDS in Indonesia. We recommend that midwives are given a correct understanding of HIV/AIDS, through seminars, or training.

Time: http://bit.ly/VIDoM21-session-06

Recording: TBA

08. Midwives’ knowledge of pre-eclampsia management: A scoping review @ Room 4, BBB
May 5 @ 05:00 – 05:50
08. Midwives' knowledge of pre-eclampsia management: A scoping review @ Room 4, BBB

Speaker: Isabella Garti

Facilitator: Bupe Mwamba

The purpose/problem: Midwives in poorly resourced settings are engaged in pre-eclampsia management and deliver lifesaving interventions depending on the prescribed scope of practice. Therefore, we aimed to produce a synthesized summary of what midwives from around the world know about pre-eclampsia management. Method: We utilized the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) format and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta‐Analysis extension for scoping reviews (PRISMA-Scr) checklist. Results: Following application of the inclusion criteria, twenty journal articles from low- and middle-income countries and nine guidelines were reviewed. Three main themes identified related to management whilst the last theme described how contextual factors led to either increased or decreased knowledge of pre-eclampsia. Conclusion: Midwives in some low- and middle-income countries have knowledge deficits of several aspects of pre-eclampsia management. The review suggests pragmatic steps are urgently needed to strengthen the knowledge base of practicing midwives in resourced constrained settings.

Time: http://bit.ly/VIDoM21-session-08

Recording: https://youtu.be/apEvbf1x8-o

 

10. Placental abruption in immigrant women in Norway @ Room 4, BBB
May 5 @ 07:00 – 07:50
10. Placental abruption in immigrant women in Norway @ Room 4, BBB

Speaker: Karolina Maeland

Facilitator: Marie Buckleygray

Placental abruption is a serious complication in pregnancy. While its incidence varies across countries, the information of how abruption varies in immigrant populations is limited. The aims of this study were to estimate the incidence of placental abruption in immigrant women compared to non-immigrants by maternal country and region of birth, reason for immigration and length of residence. We conducted a nationwide population-based study using data from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway and Statistics Norway (1990-2016). The study sample included 1,558,174 pregnancies, in which immigrant women accounted for 245,887 pregnancies and 1,312,287 pregnancies were to non-immigrants. The incidence of placental abruption decreased during the study period for both immigrants and non-immigrants. Immigrant women from sub-Saharan Africa, especially Ethiopia, have increased odds for placental abruption when giving birth in Norway. Reason for immigration and length of residence had little impact on the incidence of placental abruption.

Time: http://bit.ly/VIDoM21-session-10

Recording: https://youtu.be/0KcA-vHOTEQ

12. Acupressure for pain relief in labour @ Room 4 - BBB
May 5 @ 09:00 – 09:50
12. Acupressure for pain relief in labour @ Room 4 - BBB

Speaker: Loredana Zordan

Facilitator: Olajumoke Ojeleye

Description: Acupressure is the application of pressure to acupuncture points. Acupuncture points are situated on meridians containing Qi (Energy ) that flow through the body. Certain points affect areas of brain known to reduce sensitivity to pain and stress, increasing endorphin, and the production of oxytocin. Oxytocin the love hormone it is important in labour as it will help the woman to cope better with the pain, helping her to relax reducing pain perception promote relaxation and physical and emotional wellbeing. Acupressure is a non invasive technique, easy to use and offer more choice for women that want to avoid pharmacological pain relief in labour and promotes birthing partner involvement Acupressure would also allow midwives to expand their role ,becoming more complete and independent practitioner and to practice midwifery fully ,I believe that using acupressure would provide better care to women, whilst empowering them through offering choice experience .

Check the time in your location: http://bit.ly/VIDoM21-session-12

Recording: TBA

14. Birth and the Clitoris @ Room 4 - BBB
May 5 @ 11:00 – 11:50
14. Birth and the Clitoris @ Room 4 - BBB

Speaker: Margaret Jowitt

Facilitator: Eunice Atsali

The extensive anatomy of the clitoris, revealed by Helen O’Connell as recently as 2005 through dissection and MRI, shows it to be mostly an internal organ. Its location, underneath the symphysis pubis, provides a biological explanation for the ‘G spot’ on the anterior vaginal wall, where stimulation can result in orgasm. Most sources state that the sole function of female orgasm is sexual gratification. We know that orgasm is not required for conception, however, it may well be part of the birth process. The pressure of the fetal head on the anterior vaginal wall impinges on the clitoris which may lead to movement of the pelvis, oxytocin secretion and lubrication of the outlet. If this is the case, lithotomy position would not be conducive to birth; fetal pressure exerted at the front of the pelvis would be better than pressure at the back.

Check the time in your location: http://bit.ly/VIDoM21-session-14

Recording: https://youtu.be/56fhOpXF5uM

16. Midwives’ satisfaction with the paperless partograph as a tool for monitoring labour in a secondary care facility in Katsina State @ Room 4 - BBB
May 5 @ 13:00 – 13:50
16. Midwives’ satisfaction with the paperless partograph as a tool for monitoring labour in a secondary care facility in Katsina State @ Room 4 - BBB

Speaker: Aisha Salihu Abdullahi

Facilitators: Halima Musa Abdul & Afolabi Olajumoke

Description: Background: Midwives remain the major human resource for improving maternal health in communities especially by providing essential intrapartum care that is paramount in reducing maternal mortality. A paperless approach to the use of the partograph can ensure the use of the partograph by midwives in low resource settings thereby decreasing prolonged labours with its attendant morbidities. Aim: This study aimed to assess midwives’ satisfaction on the use of the paperless partograph in monitoring of labours in Katsina, Nigeria. Methodology: A descriptive cross-sectional research design was used. A total of 16 midwives employed in the delivery ward of the secondary care facility were purposefully recruited for the study. Using a researcher questionnaire, the opinion of the midwives working in the delivery ward were obtained. Results: The midwives reported satisfaction with the tool with an aggregate mean of 5.78 (constant mean = 4). Conclusion: the paperless partograph is a satisfactory tool that can be adopted for the monitoring of labours.

Check time in your location: http://bit.ly/VIDoM21-session-16

Recording:TBA

19. US Midwife Student experience in the COVID-19 pandemic @ Room 4, BBB
May 5 @ 16:00 – 16:50
19. US Midwife Student experience in the COVID-19 pandemic @ Room 4, BBB

Speakers: Cindy Farley and Student Panel – Christy Cannon, Charlei Coffey, Lauren Radney, Raven Fulton, and Anna Dykstra

Facilitator: Lorraine Mockford

The Corona virus pandemic has impacted all aspects of society, including the education of midwives. Clinical sites suspended student placements in the early days of the pandemic, significantly altering clinical progression and delaying graduation for many students. In person classes were cancelled and quickly pivoted to remote learning, leading to rapid curricular adjustments by midwifery faculty. Students also faced personal and professional stresses related to COVID-19 changes, such as children attending school at home, self or family members with job or income loss or alterations, and risk of exposure to the virus to self and loved ones. These changes tended to increase anxiety and obligation outside the classroom that influenced time and energy for learning. Nevertheless, midwifery students persisted toward their goals. Students in the midwifery education program at Georgetown University, US, will describe their experiences at home, and in the classroom and clinical as altered by the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Time: bit.ly/VIDoM21-session-19

Recording: TBA

21. The attitudes of Ontario midwives towards sexual and gender minorities: Results from a cross-sectional survey study (English and Spanish) @ Room 4 - BBB
May 5 @ 18:00 – 18:50
21. The attitudes of Ontario midwives towards sexual and gender minorities: Results from a cross-sectional survey study (English and Spanish) @ Room 4 - BBB

Speaker: Jennifer Goldberg

Facilitator: Niessa Meier

This study is a mixed mode (paper and internet) cross-sectional survey that explores midwives’ attitudes towards sexual and gender minority people (SGM). The need for this research is demonstrated by: (1) published literature showing midwives’ attitudes shape the care experiences of lesbian women; (2) a lack of literature on midwives’ attitudes towards all SGM. The response rate was 29.2% (n=270). Data analysis is in progress and includes measurement of Ontario midwives’ attitudes towards SGM and assessment of differences in attitudes toward SGM based on socio-demographic data. This study addresses a crucial gap at the intersection of SGM health equity and midwifery. Understanding how attitudes are shaped can help inform the process to build the capacity of midwives to provide quality, inclusive and safe care to all SGM, which could play an important role in reducing health disparities of SGM and improve their health outcomes.

NOTE: This presentation will be first in English, then in Spanish. Questions and answers will be in either language.

Check the time in your location: http://bit.ly/VIDoM21-session-21

Recording: TBA

23. Midwives as change advocates in the public system (Spanish) @ Room 4 - BBB
May 5 @ 20:00 – 20:50
23. Midwives as change advocates in the public system (Spanish) @ Room 4 - BBB

Speaker(s): Ameyalli Aide Juarez Orea, Mariana Montaño Sosa, and Zeus Aranda

Facilitator: Marcela Mendoza Nunez

Since 2016, nurse-midwives have strengthened obstetric care at a birthing center and its adjacent basic community hospital in Chiapas, Mexico. In Mexico, delivery care continues to be monopolized by medical personnel who do not always provide respectful, evidence-based care. We want to share the challenges we have faced and the lessons learned during these 5 years. Since the birthing center project began, birth care practices in the facilities where we work have undergone noticeable changes: Comparing the first (August 2016-July 2017) and the last (August 2020-present) year of the project, the proportion of deliveries in which pregnant women are given the possibility to have a companion of their choice during labor has increased by 70%, while the proportion of deliveries in which pregnant women are given the possibility to choose the position of delivery has increased by 62%. 

Check the time in your location: http://bit.ly/VIDoM21-session-23

Recording: TBA