VIDM 2020 Programme Calendar

All VIDM 2020 Conference sessions are listed using UTC, starting at 22:00 on 04 May. The WHO COVID-19 Preconference sessions start at 19:00 UTC on 04 May.  Each listing contains a  link for you to check the time in your location.

VIDM 2020 Conference sessions are presented using BigBlueButton webconferencing technology.  How to access the conference? Check the “Attending the Conference” tab above or go here: Accessing the Conference 2020

You won’t want to miss a session — add these events to your personal calendar in your local time!  Click ‘Subscribe’ at the bottom of the calendar for options. Change the programme view at the top right of the calendar or search at top left – Search CATEGORIES and KEYWORDS (ie. Student Stream and Spanish).

May
4
Mon
2020
01. KEYNOTE :: Humanising Childbirth: what can midwives do? @ Room 1 - BBB
May 4 @ 22:00 – 22:50
01. KEYNOTE :: Humanising Childbirth: what can midwives do? @ Room 1 - BBB

Speaker: Sheena Byrom

Facilitator: Catherine Salam

Check the time in your location: http://bit.ly/VIDoM20-start-time

It is the Year of the Nurse and the Midwife and we are in the midst of a global pandemic. The world is reeling with the consequences of an unstoppable COVID-19 virus spread with reports of growing morbidities and mortalities each day, yet mothers and their unborn and newborn babies continue to need safe, compassionate maternity care. Whilst most childbearing women and their babies are healthy, they may experience clinical, psychological, and social vulnerabilities (Renfrew et al 2020).

In normal circumstances midwifery is acknowledged as the solution for quality maternal and newborn care (Renfrew et al 2014). In addition, midwives have been identified as having an essential role to play in humanitarian settings due to their position in communities, unique knowledge and skills (Beek et al 2019). However, in some parts of the world midwifery led services are being reduced due to various reasons including shortage of midwives (for various reasons) and lack of appropriate transfer systems.

During times of crisis there are greater risks of avoidable harm (Renfrew et al 2020) and in some countries reports are coming through that unnecessary interventions are being imposed such as Caesarean section deliveries and separation of mothers and babies even though international policy and position statement advice the contrary (ICM 2020, RCOG, WHO 2020). These events are in direct opposition to the increasing global movement to humanise childbirth from international policy to the direct contact we have with mothers, babies and families (Newnham et al 2018; Newnham & Page 2020) and it is our duty to challenge the situation.

At the end of this pandemic we are likely to see significant economic downturn where the most vulnerable will suffer the most. We must remember this and direct our attention to maximise the potential for a positive mother-infant connection during the critical time at birth, and early years.

This session will present the above challenges faced by midwives, mothers and families and offer potential solutions to support midwives in their quest to continue to provide optimal, humanised maternity care.

References

Recording: HERE

May
5
Tue
2020
03. Recomendaciones para la implementación de Habitaciones (LPR) en la atención sostenible del parto respetado. (Spanish) @ Room 1, BBB
May 5 @ 00:00 – 00:50
03. Recomendaciones para la implementación de Habitaciones (LPR) en la atención sostenible del parto respetado. (Spanish) @ Room 1, BBB

English: Recommendations for the implementation of LPR rooms in the sustainable care of respectful birth.

Speaker: Carina Salgado

Facilitator:  Marcela Mendoza

Fondo: Las habitaciones (LPR) permiten en la mujer de bajo riesgo realizar una labor, parto y recuperación de manera segura respetuosa e intercultural.

Objetivo: Evidenciar los beneficios de la implementación de salas LPR en las unidades de salud hospitalaria.

Desarrollo: Las habitaciones sin tecnología llena de aditamentos para el parto respetado como, por ejemplo; camas de casa arcos de madera donde cuelgan rebozos, bancos de parto, agradan al 100% de las usuarias, permiten la privacidad, evolucion del nacimiento fisiológico y mejor cumplimiento de las recomendaciones de las 56 recomendaciones OMS/OPS para el parto respetado de bajo riesgo.

Conclusiones: La implementación de estos espacios es sostenible para los servicios de salud puesto que con una inversión ma­nima se reduce el índice de cesáreas y mejora los resultados materno perinatales.

English: Background: The LPR rooms allow low-risk women to perform labor, birth and recovery in a safe, respectful and intercultural manner.

Objective: To demonstrate the benefits of the implementation of LPR rooms in hospital health units.

Results: The rooms without technology filled with homelike items such as; wooden beds, wooden arches where rebozos hung, childbirth benches, pleased 100% of users, allows privacy, the evolution of the physiological birth and better compliance with the 56 WHO / PAHO recommendations for respectful low-risk births.

Conclusions: The implementation of these spaces is sustainable for health services since with a minimum of investment, the rate of caesarean sections is reduced and the maternal perinatal results are improved.

Recording: HERE

05. Labor Pain – It’s all in your Head @ Room 1, BBB
May 5 @ 02:00 – 02:50
05. Labor Pain - It's all in your Head @ Room 1, BBB

Speaker: Tracy Donegan

Facilitator: Jane Houston

There is a current trend toward natural pain management in labor such as yoga, mind-body therapies, water immersion etc however there is limited but growing evidence for many of the complimentary (CAM) therapies. In this presentation I will discuss the need for childbirth education to evolve with the science of pain education. The neuromatrix theory of pain proposes that pain is a multidimensional experience influenced by physical, cognitive and emotional events. Data suggests that when learners (parents) have basic ‘pain literacy’ through an educational intervention midwives can empower parents to intentionally ‘hack’ pain processing networks of the brain in labour to reduce the need for analgesics in labour. For mothers with a strong desire for normal physiological birth it is essential that midwives have an understanding of the neuroscience of pain that can easily be conveyed by midwives and understood by parents in birth preparation classes.

Recording: HERE

08. KEYNOTE :: Autonomous Midwife-led Continuity Of Care: Evidence-based, Respectful Care Within A Collaborative Model @ Room 1 - BBB
May 5 @ 05:00 – 05:50
08. KEYNOTE :: Autonomous Midwife-led Continuity Of Care: Evidence-based, Respectful Care Within A Collaborative Model @ Room 1 - BBB

Speaker: Vijaya Krishnan

Facilitator: Linda Wylie

Recording: HERE

KEYNOTE: Research over the past few years has focused not only on maternal and infant mortality, but also the quality of the care provided, and respectful maternity care as a human right. Research also tells us that antenatal childbirth preparation, which includes childbirth classes and one-on-one counselling has positive effects on the course of labor and delivery, as well as higher rates of breastfeeding. Studies on outcomes of mothers receiving continuous labor support, tell us that she has a higher chance of vaginal birth, less interventions, less C-sections, better start to breastfeeding, less postpartum depression, and an overall better maternal experience. The WHO currently highly recommends Midwife-Led Continuity-of-Care models, in which a known midwife or small group of known midwives supports a woman throughout her antenatal, intrapartum and postnatal period, as a way to improve at least 50 different short-term and long-term outcomes, as well as provide respectful, safe and satisfying maternity care.

This presentation describes the current state of maternity care in India, with nearly 85-90% C-section rates, and lack of respectful, evidence-based care being the norm. India is also a country where there are both extremes of care “Too little, too late”, and “Too much, too soon”. In such an environment, this presentation aims to tie in the benefits of excellent Autonomous Midwife-Led Continuity of Care, within a Collaborative Model of Care (CMC), with in-house Emergency Infrastructure and Consultants. This is a model which we have honed to near perfection over the last 12 years.  Our statistics serve as a proof of the efficacy of this Model of Care – 92% Natural Birth rate, 90% VBAC rate, 100% VBA2C, Twin Natural Births and many Breech Births – and, these numbers are inclusive of mothers with complex needs like GDM, PIH, etc.

It will describe how this CMC can be replicated, and how any facility with specifically trained, professional and specialist Midwives, can create a Birth Environment similar to The Sanctum Natural Birth Center.

 

10. Teaching evidence based exercise and fitness classes in India. @ Room 1, BBB
May 5 @ 07:00 – 07:50
10. Teaching evidence based exercise and fitness classes in India. @ Room 1, BBB

Speaker(s): Donna Mitchell

Facilitator(s): Chris Woodhouse and Janine McKnight Cowan

Description: In India women are heavily censored to take rest and not to move a lot during their pregnancy. They are told not to take stairs, go for walks, travel and even sometimes stop working. This creates a lack of stamina and communication with the body during labor. I created a workout class based on ACOG recommendations on pregnant women being active in a medium to high level intensity. This increases blood flow to placenta and baby, healthier eating and water intake, increased stamina during labor and quicker healing postpartum. How active women are during pregnancy relates directly to healthy pregnancies and satisfaction of their births.

Check the time in your location: http://bit.ly/VIDoM20-session-10

Recording: HERE

12. Hands on technique to promote coping in birth. @ Room 1, BBB
May 5 @ 09:00 – 09:50
12. Hands on technique to promote coping in birth. @ Room 1, BBB

Speaker(s): Heidi Meyer Vallentin

Facilitator(s): Karen Wilmot

Description: I am a midwife and the developer of a technique called the Meyer-method, which is a hands on technique based on Gate control and hypnosis practiced by the midwife to promote coping in birth and redirecting pain signals.

Creating better progression and less pain experience. Thus resulting in less medication and intervention in birth.

Also the technique can be taught to the birthing partner which promotes teamwork and shared better birth experience.

The technique is well known in Denmark and I will present The Meyer method in ICM Bali 2020. Also initiatives towards testing the method has been taken in Denmark. I would love to give this simple technique to midwives all over the world via your conference.

Check the time in your location: http://bit.ly/VIDoM20-session-12

Recording: HERE

14. The Acceptability of Routine Screening for Intimate Partner Violence by Pregnant Women in Northern Nigeria. @ Room 1, BBB
May 5 @ 11:00 – 11:50
14. The Acceptability of Routine Screening for Intimate Partner Violence by Pregnant Women in Northern Nigeria. @ Room 1, BBB

Speaker(s): Ayishetu Musa-Maliki

Facilitator(s): Olajumoke Ojeleye

Routine screening, is the application of standardized questions to all symptom-free women according to a procedure that does not vary from place to place. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of IPV and acceptability of routine screening of IPV by pregnant women in northern Nigeria. A cross sectional descriptive design was used to administered questionnaire to 90 respondents after being screened for IPV with the Abuse Assessment Screen tool. The prevalence rate is 32%, and 80% of Pregnant women were satisfied with, and accepted that routine screening for IPV be incorporated into the ANC daily routine. Their reasons included; it helps them to voice out, receives good advice to their marital problems, and the lives of their foetus can be safe. There is pressing need for policy makers, at all relevant levels, to make policies on routine screening for IPV to be included in ANC routine.

Recording: HERE

16. Evaluation of the new Bangladesh Young Midwife Leadership Programme. @ Room 1, BBB
May 5 @ 13:00 – 13:50
16. Evaluation of the new Bangladesh Young Midwife Leadership Programme. @ Room 1, BBB

Speaker(s): Karima Akter and Pinki Datta

Facilitator(s): Jennifer Akuamoah-Boateng

Effective midwifery leadership has been identified as a key component for improving the midwifery profession at the strategic level. The Bangladesh Midwifery Society in partnership with the Royal College of Midwives have developed a bespoke Young Midwife Leader (YML) Programme for Bangladeshi midwives. With midwifery only being introduced in Bangladesh in 2014, ensuring midwives have a seat at the decision-making table in Bangladesh is integral for embedding the profession in the country’s healthcare agenda.

The YML Programme delivered a range of training to participants aiming to equip them with important midwifery leadership skills. These included training on project management, IT, advocacy, media, and training in research and writing abstracts. In our presentation you will hear from some members of the first cohort of YML to graduate from the programme. Alongside sharing their experiences, we will reflect on the successes and challenges of the programme so far.

Recording: HERE

18. KEYNOTE :: The Midwifery Mandate in Global Crises: Leadership, Innovation, and Humility @ Room 1 - BBB
May 5 @ 15:00 – 15:50
18. KEYNOTE :: The Midwifery Mandate in Global Crises: Leadership, Innovation, and Humility @ Room 1 - BBB

Speaker: Saraswathi Vedam

Facilitator: Cecilia Jevitt

Recording: HERE

The World Health Organization (WHO) and Office of High Commissioner of Human Rights have affirmed that freedom from discrimination, harm and mistreatment are human rights and important outcomes (Bohren et al., 2015), and[i] that health systems need to improve measurement and accountability for the experience of childbearing care (Freedman and Kruk). Loss of autonomy, mistreatment, abuse, coercion, and disrespect during pregnancy and facility-based birth before and during the COVID-19 pandemic have been documented by researchers, clinicians, lawyers, governments, and community organizations. Poor treatment due to institutional racism, implicit bias, and lack of access to preferred models of care, can transform health care encounters into human rights violations.  Among families with non-dominant identities, circumstances, or backgrounds, asymmetric and hierarchical power relationships, as well as gender-based violence, these health inequities are exacerbated.

Integration of midwives into health care systems is a key strategy that can improve quality of care (Lancet 2014).  Overall, in high, middle, and low resource settings, those who experienced midwifery care report lower interventions, more respect, and greater autonomy in decision making; but experiences of discrimination and disrespect are still significantly increased among marginalized communities, regardless of type of provider or birth setting.  Indigenous midwifery traditions, and strengths-based community-led rapid response to adverse environments can offer innovative solutions to all midwives.

What is our responsibility as midwives to model self-reflection, leadership, adaptability, collaboration, and accountability for improving equity, access, and respect during reproductive health encounters?  This session will describe emerging research findings on the prevalence and characteristics of respectful maternity care, midwifery strategic leadership, and transdisciplinary initiatives to address the gaps in respectful care for all families – during global crises and beyond.

RESOURCES:

Birth Place Lab

VIDM 2020 Session 18 Saraswathi Vedam

 

20. How leadership, management skills can be developed to improve midwifery? @ Room 1, BBB
May 5 @ 17:00 – 17:50
20. How leadership, management skills can be developed to improve midwifery? @ Room 1, BBB

Speaker(s): Lourdes De La Peza

Facilitator(s): Elisa Segoni

Description: Training midwives in leadership, management, and governance (L+M+G) has been identified as a key intervention by the Lancet and the World Health Organization to ensure effective provision of maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) services worldwide. UNFPA (State of the World’s Midwifery, UNFPA, 2014) recommends the employment of 112,000 midwives in 38 developing countries and questions curriculum that teach only clinical skills. Studies conducted by Australian College of Nursing (ACN) have also established that strong Nursing and Midwifery leadership leads to better workplace environments, better staff retention, and patient health outcomes in general. During this presentation it will be discussed the potential of the Leadership, Management and Governance for Midwifery Managers certificate (Developed by the USAID-funded LMG Project) to provide midwifery managers with L+M+G skills to address challenges and improve MNCH outcomes.

Check the time in your location: http://bit.ly/VIDoM20-session-20

Recording: HERE

22. Transformation of the Uterus and the Dance of Labour @ Room 1
May 5 @ 19:00 – 19:50
22. Transformation of the Uterus and the Dance of Labour @ Room 1

Speaker: Margaret Jowitt

Facilitator: Chris Woodhouse and Buky Afolabi

Presents a new biomechanical model of uterine function, explaining the mechanism of uterine activity in terms of the mechanical properties of uterine tissue. Once the power is unleashed, the fetus sets the pace. Tells how the movements of mother and baby work with – or against – the uterus to position the baby optimally for the journey through the pelvis. How midwives can enable mothers to work with their baby and their uterus to achieve better birth.

Check the time in your location: http://bit.ly/VIDoM20-session-22

Recording: https://bit.ly/3gSWELN

24. KEYNOTE :: Ecology of childbirth @ Room 1 - BBB
May 5 @ 21:00 – 21:50
24. KEYNOTE :: Ecology of childbirth @ Room 1 - BBB

Speaker: Susan Crowther

Facilitator: Annette Dalsgaard

Description: In this presentation Susan will journey through her work and insights about psycho-spiritual wholeness in and around childbirth revealing how childbirth is a significant and seminal human encounter with life. These moments in our lives are precious and need to be treated with care and tenderness lest we loss something of existential value. Much work still needs to be done in our health systems for them to align fully with the fullness of what childbirth is beyond the biomedical understandings that predominantly inform our current systems of care. Susan will share recent outcomes of an international co-operative inquiry that explored ways of transformation in how and what we do to enhance and honour an ecology of childbirth.

Recording: HERE

24 B. Closing Video @ Room 1, BBB
May 5 @ 22:00 – 22:30
24 B. Closing Video @ Room 1, BBB

Facilitator: Annette Dalsgaard

It’s not over yet! Following the closing Keynote speaker, stay in Room 1 and join the VIDM Organizing Committee, volunteers, and delegates as we say thank-you for another year.

Closing video: HERE

Music by Emma Martin “This Woman’s Hands”. Used with permission of the artist.
https://emmamartin.bandcamp.com/releases